Prevention

Stop cancer before it's too late.

Click on the buttons below to jump to a topic.

Prevention

Stop cancer before it's too late.

Click on the buttons below to jump to a topic.

In the photo: A person receiving vaccination; image from http://www.dentistry.co.uk

Vaccination

Sometimes, the body may get rid of HPV on its own, but if not - the virus can potentially cause cervical cancer. This is where vaccines come in.

HPV Vaccines Cervarix & Gardasil help guard against HPV types which are more likely to cause cancer. 

  • Cervarix (Bivalent) protects against 2 HPV types 16 & 18, which cause most of the cases.

  • Gardasil 4 (Quadrivalent) protects against 4 HPV types, 16 and 18, plus 6 and 11 which prevent genital warts.

  • Gardasil 9 (nonavalent) protects against 9 HPV types  16, 18, 6, 11, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

9-13 year old girls should get any of the three vaccines. Meanwhile, boys of the same age may only be given Gardasil. The vaccines are given in 2 doses, with an interval of at least 6 months and not exceeding 12-15 months per dose.

For those older than 15 years, 3 doses are required, with a two-month and six-month interval in between each dose.

Pregnant Women

Although clinical trials on pregnant women have shown no negative effects on the pregnancy, it is still not recommended as studies are few. If she has been given the first few shots, it is advisable that she continue the rest after the pregnancy.

People with Allergies

Some components of the vaccine may trigger an effect on people with allergies (yeast allergy for Gardasil, latex allergy for Cervarix prefilled syringes). Thus, it may be best to mention any allergies to your doctor before getting vaccinated.

You can be assured that the vaccine is safe and effective because of the following reasons:

  • Licensure

    It is clinically safe and licensed in over 100 countries.

  • GACVS-monitored

    The Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety (GACVS) continues to monitor and study the effects of HPV Vaccine across different countries and thus far, it has not found any evidence linking the vaccine to negative concerns.

  • W.H.O.

    It is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO)

  • Recent Impact

    In a 2017 report, incidence of cervical lesions has decreased by 50% in several countries that have introduced HPV Vaccination into their immunization programmes.

Vaccination

Sometimes, the body may get rid of HPV on its own, but if not - the virus can potentially cause cervical cancer. This is where vaccines come in.

HPV Vaccines Cervarix & Gardasil help guard against HPV types which are more likely to cause cancer. 

  • Cervarix (Bivalent) protects against 2 HPV types 16 & 18, which cause most of the cases.

  • Gardasil 4 (Quadrivalent) protects against 4 HPV types, 16 and 18, plus 6 and 11 which prevent genital warts.

  • Gardasil 9 (nonavalent) protects against 9 HPV types  16, 18, 6, 11, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

9-13 year old girls should get any of the three vaccines. Meanwhile, boys of the same age may only be given Gardasil. The vaccines are given in 2 doses, with an interval of at least 6 months and not exceeding 12-15 months per dose.

For those older than 15 years, 3 doses are required, with a two-month and six-month interval in between each dose.

Pregnant Women

Although clinical trials on pregnant women have shown no negative effects on the pregnancy, it is still not recommended as studies are few. If she has been given the first few shots, it is advisable that she continue the rest after the pregnancy.

People with Allergies

Some components of the vaccine may trigger an effect on people with allergies (yeast allergy for Gardasil, latex allergy for Cervarix prefilled syringes). Thus, it may be best to mention any allergies to your doctor before getting vaccinated.

You can be assured that the vaccine is safe and effective because of the following reasons:

  • Licensure

    It is clinically safe and licensed in over 100 countries.

  • GACVS-monitored

    The Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety (GACVS) continues to monitor and study the effects of HPV Vaccine across different countries and thus far, it has not found any evidence linking the vaccine to negative concerns.

  • W.H.O.

    It is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO)

  • Recent Impact

    In a 2017 report, incidence of cervical lesions has decreased by 50% in several countries that have introduced HPV Vaccination into their immunization programmes.

HEALTHY LIFESTYLE
Practicing a healthy lifestyle will keep your immune system strong, and avoiding risky behaviors are great ways to reduce the risk of cervical cancer.

Healthy Lifestyle

Practicing a healthy lifestyle will keep your immune system strong, and avoiding risky behaviors are great ways to reduce the risk of cervical cancer.

icon_diet_cPinkA

Eat a proper and healthy diet

icon_exercise_cPinkA

Exercise Regularly

icon_sleep_cPinkA

Get Enough Sleep

icon_smoke_cPinkA

Avoid Smoking

icon_safesex_cPinkA

Practice the use of safe sex

icon_1partner_cPinkA

Limit sexual partners

icon_marry_cPinkA

Wait until marriage before having sex

PRJ3-Assets-10

Screening

Screening is a way to detect the lesions in the cervix, and, if any are found, determine how far along the disease is. It is a secondary prevention method, used to detect the cancer early even before it is malignant.

Screening is important even after vaccination, as the cancer can occur years after the initial infection, and can be caused by other HPV types not protected by the vaccines. It is recommended to be screened at least every 3 years starting from age 21 until age 65.

PRJ3-Assets-10

Screening

Screening is a way to detect the lesions in the cervix, and, if any are found, determine how far along the disease is. It is a secondary prevention method, used to detect the cancer early even before it is malignant.

 

Screening is important even after vaccination, as the cancer can occur years after the initial infection, and can be caused by other HPV types not protected by the vaccines. It is recommended to be screened at least every 3 years starting from age 21 until age 65.

In the photo: In the photo: Speculum (left) used to open the vagina for examination of the cervix

Screening Methods

icon_brush_cPinkA

Pap Smear

Also known as cervical cytology, the pap smear is one of the most popular screening methods. During a pap smear, the doctor takes cells from the cervix and examines them under a microscope.

zz-stc-02

Visual Inspection with Acetic Acid

Visual inspection with Acetic Acid, or VIA, is a test where the doctor looks at the cervix a minute after the application of acetic acid. Areas which become white are considered positive for screening, whether it is due to an infection, or a premalignant or malignant lesion.

Screening Methods

icon_brush_cPinkA

Pap Smear

Also known as cervical cytology, the pap smear is one of the most popular screening methods. During a pap smear, the doctor takes cells from the cervix and examines them under a microscope.

zz-stc-02

Visual Inspection with Acetic Acid

Visual inspection with Acetic Acid, or VIA, is a test where the doctor looks at the cervix a minute after the application of acetic acid. Areas which become white are considered positive for screening, whether it is due to an infection, or a premalignant or malignant lesion.